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Growing Marijuana Plants in Soil

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Soil is critical to the healthy cultivation of your marijuana plants. The soil your marijuana plants are growing in will have a lasting effect on their ability to handle environmental changes and stressors, and therefore also affects the final harvest. Before you even begin the growing season with marijuana plants, you will need to understand what it means to provide your plants with healthy soil.

In this article we will discuss:

High-quality soil
Soil vs. Hydroponics
Soil supplies
DIY soil
Outdoor soil
Super soil
Organic soil

High-quality soil

High-quality marijuana soil

To ensure that your marijuana plants can have a healthy life of growth, you need to start with a high-quality of the soil. This means not only buying good soil to begin with but also preparing it properly and maintaining its quality throughout your plants’ growing season. More about high-quality soil in my free grow bible.

Soil vs. Hydroponics

Soil vs. Hydroponics

Most growers face the decision between growing their marijuana plants in soil or in hydroponics, a water-based system that is favored by many because it allows your marijuana plants to take in nutrients at an accelerated rate. At the same time, a hydroponics has a high price tag attached to it and is not to be attempted by amateurs. While hydroponics can speed up the rate of your plants’ growth, the soil is often the best choice for people who don’t want to spend the extra money, people who are beginners, or people who don’t have a large amount of time or energy to devote to growing their marijuana plants.

Growing in soil has other benefits with it as well, including having the ability to hold down the roots of your plants in times of stormy weather, such as wind or rain. Soil also serves as the transport for water to reach your marijuana plants’ roots. If the soil is good quality, it should even retain plenty of water – effectively giving the roots the time they need to absorb as much water as possible.

Good quality soil should have a loose texture whether it is wet or dry, but at the same time it should be packed tightly enough that it can hold down the roots of your plants. Poor quality soil will stunt growth rather than encourage fast, healthy plant development.

Soil supplies

Soil supplies marijuana

Since having good quality soil is about more than just buying high-end stuff, you will have to do a certain amount of preparation. To start off, it’s a good idea to buy peat plugs, which are mesh-covered cylinders that make for a healthy beginning to your plants’ lives. Simply indent the top of it in a kind of hole, using a pen or pencil. Just make the indent about half an inch deep.

Put the seed inside of this hole, and then place the peat plug in the tray that comes with it. Fill it with water to about a half-inch deep. Because water trickles through the peat plugs quite quickly, make sure that it always has water inside.

Download my free marijuana grow guide and learn more about soil supplies

If you are having trouble finding peat plugs, potting soil will work just as well. Composted manure is another option, given its high amount of nutrients contained within. With potting soil or composted manure, just put the seed halfway down into it, and then after that be sure to keep the soil soft consistently, as it has a tendency to become thick and hard due to its higher density than “normal” soil. Some growers will add some sand or sandy soil to make the soil less dense, so that is always an option as well. Try mixing in leaf or grass mulch, dried peat moss, local dirt, or sand to create a nutrient-rich, loose potting soil for your marijuana seeds.

DIY soil

DIY soil

For people with certain lifestyles, making soil themselves makes a lot of sense. Farmers or Growers experienced with composting are examples of these types of people — if you fall into this category, you may want to try making your soil.

Cow or pig manure that has been aged for a year or more will make for a fantastic, nutrient-rich soil. Even if half of it is sand, it should give all the nutrients that a new marijuana plant requires to thrive. Topsoil can also be bought. As long as it looks black and healthy, it is probably healthy enough to remain unchanged for planting your marijuana garden.

Outdoor soil

Outdoor soil

When growing indoors, altering the soil is easy; if you’re growing them outside, however, you will need to work a little harder to keep the same quality of the soil. Soil that is already rich and prepared should be added to your grow site. This should even work if your site is in a place with poor quality natural soil there — essentially, you are changing the quality of the spot’s soil. If it is a location with dirt that isn’t high quality, it will probably be a safer choice anyway, as people searching for illegal marijuana grow sites probably won’t think to look in areas that have low-quality soil. More about outdoor soil in my free grow bible.

Super soil

Super soil marijuana

You may have heard of something called “Super Soil,” which is a type of soil that is particularly useful for growing marijuana plants. It uses compost, making a naturally effective kind of soil that works wonders for new plants. The best part about using Super Soil is that it does not need to be maintained the way other soils do. Adding water is all you would have to do — and, better yet, it’s completely organic.

Of course, creating Super Soil takes a lot of work before even getting started. It, therefore, is best for people growing lots of marijuana plants each season to have a worthy payoff. Some growers prefer to simply buy Super Soil, which is almost as perfect as creating your own Super Soil would be. Try finding Subcool Super Soil to get it with less effort and better payoff.

Organic soil

Organic soil marijuana

Other organic soils (besides Super Soil) are also extremely effective. Organic soils don’t require as much preparation and effort as creating Super Soil does, making it a nice alternative option. Organic soils mixed with organic nutrients work best — but if you use liquid nutrients, be sure to keep track of the pH levels of the soil.

Thanks for reading. Please leave comments or questions below and don’t forget to download my free grow bible.

Robert
www.ilovegrowingmarijuana.com

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